Buddhist devotees in Yushu, China, rescue tiny river fish from riverbanks as an expression of the Buddhist reverence for all forms of life and as a gesture to help in their next life.

2013 story

Two years after the disaster at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant, people are still worried about contaminated food, and farmers are struggling.

The state is experiencing the worst drought in its history. Find out just how bad the situation is getting and what it means for you.

It’s springtime, and farmers throughout the Midwest and South are preparing to plant corn—and lots of it. The USDA projects this year’s corn crop will cover 94 million acres, the most in 68 years. (By comparison, the state of California occupies a land mass of about 101 million acres.) Nearly all of that immense stand of corn will be planted with seeds treated with neonicotinoid pesticides produced by the German chemical giant Bayer.

And that may be very bad news for honey bees, which remain in a dire state of health, riddled by large annual die-offs that have become known as “colony collapse disorder” (CCD).

Neonicotinoid, known as “neonics” for short, is a farm pesticide produced primarily by the German chemical giant Bayer, widely used in the U.S. to coat a massive 142 million acres of corn, wheat, soy and cotton seeds. They are also common ingredients in many home gardening products. However, three new studies* link neonics to declining bee populations nationwide - fully a third of commercial beehives, over a million colonies, have disappeared over the past year. The pesticide works as a nerve poison, infecting their insect victims and interfering with their homing ability, which in turn prevents them from making it back to their hives.

Germany and France have already banned pesticides known to cause the death of bees and there is still time to save bees in this country if you follow suit. We urge the EPA to protect nature’s hardest workers; please ban the use of neonicotinoid pesticides from being used on crops and in household products.